Restaurants, Failed Rubber Floors

Failed Rubber Floors In Restaurants

ARE THE SO CALLED ‘WELDED SEAMS’ SPLITTING APART WHERE BLACK BACTERIA GROWTH UNDER THE DELAMINATION AT THE EDGES EMIT FOUL ODORS, SIGNALLING NOT ONLY THE BEGINNING OF THE END OF THIS SYSTEM, BUT CREATES AND ENCHORAGES AN UNSANITARY CONDITION TO EXIST WHERE FOOD IS PREPARED, AND SERVED TO YOUR CUSTOMERS?

If the rubber floor in your facility is failing, you’re not alone. Many have tried and found out they just don’t work in many environments.
Under loading and flexing of the underlying substrate weather it’s concrete, wood, or steel, the so called ‘welded seams’ separate and delamination spreads to the partially glued on sheet of rubber/vinyl flooring next to the seam. Thermal shocking may also contribute to the seam separation problem or a combination of many factors could be in play.

However, if your sheeted rubber floor, which is actually mostly vinyl, is failing, we have a less painful solution than ripping it all out, if, it’s not to far gone.

While on the subject of vinyl, did you know that architects are beginning to phase out the use of any vinyl products or products containing even a trace of vinyl in new construction for ecological reasons?

If you own or lease a restaurant on or near a coast line, that is built with wood or concrete, the problems associated with ‘rubber’, tile, and epoxy systems can be accelerated.

Even if your restaurant is a conventional slab on grade construction, some of the conditions outlined below most likely exist in your facility.

If the restaurant is elevated, whether it’s structural concrete, metal pan with concrete fill, wood, or steel, there is a 90% chance you have floor and wall problems that are causing unseen structural damage to your facility.

When food and chemical laden water leaks behind FRP board through seams or damaged areas of the board, and/or through the floor, it accelerates the degradation process of wood, concrete and some steels from the acids, sugars, chemicals, etc. present in that water.

In addition, it pollutes the ground, beach or wetlands below.

The biggest danger however, it sets you up for an unsanitary environment where food is prepared, and served to the public.

Experience dictates, if you’ve been in this industry long enough, that tile is the worst system to use over wood or concrete in a wet environment such as a kitchen or food and beverage processing of any kind.

Tile easily delaminates from a flexing substrate, especially in wet hot water situations.

Joints or grout lines in tile and ‘rubber floors’ behave as a sump pit would in a house or a catch basin in a street. They accumulate and hold water. A perfect breeding ground for harmful bacteria to flourish. In that bacterial laden water is sugar, acids, and chemicals that degrade the joints.

Once the cold joint that exists at the interface of the joint and the tile, rubber and even epoxy breaks loose from thermal shocking or loading, the system is breached and harmful bacteria will flourish.

On the upper right of your screen, there is a text box to fill out to receive a free white paper that reveal known ‘Scientific Facts’, not conjecture, about the drawbacks of certain flooring systems, especially in food or beverage relted industries.

Taking the time to read this free report will help you make an informed decision about flooring solutions based on Scientific Fact, not conjecture.

Need a New Floor Proposal? Click Here.

Tom,

Thank you for your assessment and for sharing your knowledge base.

I have a vision for this taco shop and it’s moving me in the direction it wants to go. Accordingly, I have decided that you are right and I should heed your counsel and respect your experience and expertise. I have already had numerous compliments on the new floor and I can say without any doubt at all, you will be getting many referrals from this installation.

Please proceed post haste with the remaining flooring, including the new bathroom and alcove, for the clear coat that you mentioned last evening.

When I open another location and you can do that too.

John, Punta Gorda, FL